Conjunctions

"FANBOYS Party"



Conjunctions connect words, phrases and clauses. In this song, you’ll meet the FANBOYS, an acronym to remember the conjunctions: For, And, Nor, But, Or, Yet and So. Sing along with Flocabulary’s conjunction rap song as this quirky crew of FANBOYS hooks up phrases, words and clauses.





Dude, did you guys get the text? Yeah man, I got it. There’s gonna be a FANBOYS party tonight. Yeah, I heard about that! This is gonna be awesome! ‘Aight then. Let’s go! ‘Aight, let’s go!

People say that I'm the life of the party.
Conjunctions connect...
A word, a phrase and a clause for everybody.
Conjunctions! Connect! (x2)


Send a text to your friends, pass it around,
A FANBOYS party is about to go down.
They throw a soiree to make phrases meet,
And words and clauses, this is the elite.
When the FANBOYS host a party,
You'll see these conjunctions the most, so come party with me.

“F” is FOR - FOR is formal,
A fancier way of saying because, sort of.
"Could you please pass the peas,
For my arms are a little too short to reach?"

Well, if FOR is fancy, AND is greedy,
Always adding things, AND is needy.
"Eating feasts of meats and various treats."
AND always wants more - "and I want it free!"

Meet NOR, he works as a waiter,
NOR isn't nice, no, he’s a hater.
"I won't serve you now, nor will I serve you later,"
Yeah - neither and neither are his neighbors.

B is BUT, not really full of hate,
But when BUT shows up, she's going to debate.
We talk but she butts in and disagrees,
She's cool, but she can be tough, you see?

O is OR, who can't decide,
No - OR can't ever make up her mind,
Like, does she want the fish or the steak,
OR is always afraid of making some mistake.
She could go out or she could stay in,
She’s eating vegan or loving bacon.

Y is YET, and he's a Yeti,
He's a lot like BUT, yet he
Is more fancy, see the bow tie?
Yeti YET contradicts, oh my.
He's dressed nice, yet he's a monster,
"This party's refined," - yet it's so bonkers,

SO's from the valley, loves to shop,
She hits the mall so she can get some socks,
So she could look cute in her so-called boots,
SO knows the reason, yep that's the truth.
That's the cast, and there are plenty more,
Connecting words, phrases and clauses for sure!

People say that I'm the life of the party.
Conjunctions connect...
A word, a phrase and a clause for everybody.
Conjunctions! Connect! (x2)


FANBOYS is an acronym and mnemonic to help remember the seven types of coordinating conjunctions: For, And, Nor, But, Or, Yet and So. Coordinating conjunctions can connect words, phrases and clauses. Each coordinating conjunction shows a different relationship between the words, phrases or clauses it is connecting.

This FANBOYS party will help you get to know the different uses for seven conjunctions, and you'll leave knowing when to use them to connect words, phrases and clauses.

The word "for" is most often used as a preposition, like when you say, "this chicken is for dinner." When used as a conjunction, "for" is a more formal way of saying "because" or "since." Unlike some of the other conjunctions, "for" is only used to connect complete independent clauses.

I'll be very upset if I don't earn an A on this test, for I studied for four hours.


Use "and" to connect words, phrases or clauses that are related to each other, or where the second one is adding onto the first. "And" can also show that something happened after something else.

I like to eat apples and bananas.
I purchased apples and bananas at the fruit market and made a smoothie.



"Nor" is a negative conjunction, and it connects two ideas that are stated in the negative, or not happening. It is commonly used when "neither" appears earlier in the sentence. "Nor" gives sentences a formal tone.

I won't ride the roller coaster, nor will I take a spin on the carousel.
Her boyfriend is neither funny nor nice; I don't understand what she sees in him.


"But" is conjunction that shows contrast. Whatever comes before "but" in a sentence will oppose whatever comes afterward. When "but" is used between words, it can show exception.

I usually enjoy romantic comedies, but I thought that the movie I saw on Friday was simply terrible.

Everybody but John was able to make it to my party.


When you see "or," it means that you can make a choice between the options it is connecting. "Or" can also be used to show a negative effect of a cause.

You can choose the chicken, steak or fish for your special dinner.
Eat your vegetables, or you won't get any dessert.


Like "but," the conjunction "yet" shows contrast. "Yet" conveys a more specific type of contrast than "but," though. "Yet" is used when the contrast is more surprising or strange. "Yet" also sounds more formal than but.

Our team practiced twice as hard as our opponents, yet we still lost the game.


Sometimes "so" is an adverb like in: "Stop running so fast!" But when it is a conjunction, "so" shows cause and effect. Whatever comes before "so" is the cause, and whatever comes after is the effect.

I stayed up very late, so I was tired in the morning.

When you use conjunctions to connect two words, you don't need a comma. But when you have three or more words, use commas between all the words in the list, except for the final two.

Mario and Luigi are my favorite videogame characters. This semester I am taking math, physics, English, physical education and Spanish.

When using conjunctions to connect phrases, you do not need to use a comma unless the phrases are part of a list. For example, you don't need a comma in, "I play the violin but not the viola," but you would use a comma here: "I play the violin, sing in the choir and swim on the varsity team."
When connecting two independent clauses, always place a comma and a conjunction in the middle.

We could throw a surprise party for Mia, or the whole family could just go out to dinner.

Complete each sentence with the most logical conjunction.
Ready... Set... Go!
Marcia, Jan _______ Cindy were all sisters on the Brady Bunch.
Marcia, Jan and Cindy were all sisters on the Brady Bunch.
I love most baseball teams, _______ I hate the Yankees.
I love most baseball teams, but/yet I hate the Yankees.
I left school early, _______ I had a dentist appointment.
I left school early, for I had a dentist appointment.
I'm the oldest one in the family, _______ I have the most responsibilities.
I'm the oldest one in the family, so I have the most responsibilities.
I like neither cabbage _______ caviar.
I like neither cabbage nor caviar.
"Which do you think is better: New York _______ San Francisco for vacation?"
"Which do you think is better: New York or San Francisco for vacation?"
I love riding roller coasters, _______ I always feel sick afterward.
I love riding roller coasters, yet/but I always feel sick afterward.

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